COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

THE 2021 AGWEEK CEREAL CROPS TOUR KICKS OFF WITH REPORTS FROM MINNESOTA AND SOUTH DAKOTA.

Emily Beal: WE’LL VISIT ANHEUSER BUSCH’S GROWER DAYS, AND SEE HOW THE DROUGHT IS IMPACTING BARLEY.

WITH THIS YEAR’S ADVERSE WEATHER, STRESS IS ON THE RISE IN FARM COUNTRY.

AND NOTED AG ECONOMIST DAVID KOHL PREDICTS HOW LONG THE BULL MARKET IN THE GRAINS WILL LAST.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I’M MICHELLE ROOK.

THE BIOFUELS INDUSTRY IS LICKING ITS WOUNDS AFTER ANOTHER DEFEAT IN THE COURTS, THE THIRD IN JUST THE LAST MONTH.

A DC APPEALS COURT RULED IN FAVOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS WHO ARGUED AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT’S CONCLUSION THAT BIOFUELS BLENDING OBLIGATIONS POSE NO DANGER TO ENDANGERED SPECIES HABITATS. THIS COULD IMPACT THE FUTURE OF THE RENEWABLE FUELS STANDARD.

MEANWHILE, FARM STATE LAWMAKERS INTRODUCED LEGISLATION TO ALLOW YEAR ROUND SALES OF E15, AND OIL STATE SENATORS OFFERED A BILL TO REPEAL THE ETHANOL MANDATE IN THE RFS. THE EPA ALSO SAYS IT WILL DELAY THE RFS BLENDING LEVELS.

THE FARM SERVICE AGENCY IS ALSO ADMINISTERING STANDING DROUGHT PROGRAMS AND WILL BE READY TO ROLL OUT ANY ADHOC DISASTER PROGRAMS THAT MIGHT BE APPROVED BY CONGRESS. u0009u0009

THAT’S THE WORD FROM FSA ADMINISTRATOR ZACH DUCHENEAUX. HE SAYS COUNTY OFFICES ARE BACK TO PRECOVID STAFFING LEVELS AND ARE OPERATING NORMALLY EVEN THOUGH STATE EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS HAVE NOT BEEN ANNOUNCED BY THE ADMINISTRATION. HOWEVER, THOSE APPOINTMENTS ARE FORTHCOMING.

<The Presidential personal office has been vetting applicants, receiving resumes and what’s important to know is there is a decision making apparatus in place >

MEANWHILE, HE SAYS THE PRESIDENT IS SUPPORTING THE DECISION MAKING OF THE ACTING SED’S ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO DISASTER PROGRAMS. HE SAYS FSA IS TRYING TO BE AS FLEXIBLE AS POSSIBLE WITH THOSE, AND IS STILL WAITING FOR THE SECRETARY TO DECIDE ON REQUESTS FOR EARLY RELEASE OF CRP FOR HAYING AND GRAZING.

USDA’S RISK MANAGEMENT AGENCY IS AUTHORIZING EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AS EXTREME DROUGHT CONDITIONS PERSIST ACROSS THE U.S. THE AGENCY IS WORKING WITH CROP INSURANCE COMPANIES TO SIMPLIFY THE ADJUSTMENT OF LOSSES AND ISSUE INDEMNITY PAYMENTS. INSURANCE COMPANIES CAN ALSO EXPEDITE CLAIMS TO ENABLE FARMERS TO PLANT A NEW CROP OR COVER CROP.

THIS WEEK’S CROP STOP FINDS A LIVESTOCK PRODUCER GROWING MORE CONCERNED ABOUT THE DROUGHT.

BRYAN EDEN FARMS AND RAISES CATTLE NEAR ALPENA, IN EAST CENTRAL SOUTH DAKOTA.

EDEN FARMS TYPICALLY PRODUCES UP TO 50% MORE HAY THAN THEY NEED FOR THEIR HERD, AND SELL THE REST.

THIS YEAR, THEY’LL PROBABLY NEED TO KEEP MOST OF IT, EVEN THOUGH THE PRICE HAS DOUBLED.

EDEN SAYS THEY HAVEN’T SEEN MUCH MOISTURE SINCE LAST FALL. HIS ALFALFA CROP WAS ABOUT ONE-THIRD OF NORMAL ON THE FIRST CUTTING, AND WITH NO RAIN SINCE THEN, HE DOESN’T EVEN EXPECT A SECOND CUTTING.

Bryan Eden: NOT ONLY WAS IT DRY, WE HAD SEVERAL FROST OCCURRENCES ON THE FIRST CUTTING AND WEEVILS TOO, BUGS, TO DEAL WITH. SO IT HAD A LOT OF THINGS AGAINST IT.

EDEN ANTICIPATES BRINGING IN THE CATTLE EARLY IF THE PASTURES DON’T LAST.

DESPITE SOME RECENT RAINS, CROP CONDITIONS CONTINUE TO DETERIORATE IN MINNESOTA.

SOYBEAN RATINGS DROPPED 2-PERCENT LAST WEEK TO 43-PERCENT GOOD TO EXCELLENT, WHILE CORN RATINGS HELD STEADY AT 42-PERCENT. HOWEVER, RATINGS WERE ANTICIPATED TO IMPROVE WITH RECENT MOISTURE. SOUTHWEST MINNESOTA HAS PICKED UP SEVERAL RAINS OVER THE LAST MONTH THAT HAVE HELPED IMPROVE YIELD POTENTIAL.

I think they’re going to be better than average. We’ve been catching the heat units and I think we need a few more shots of rain to finish out the season but to me in my opinion its looking pretty good right now.

HE SAYS THEY GOT ROW CROPS PLANTED EARLY AND WITH ADEQUATE GROWING DEGREE DAYS, THE CROP IS AHEAD OF SCHEDULE WHICH IS ALSO A PLUS.

ANOTHER GRAIN FACILITY IN THE REGION HAS TURNED UP INSOLVENT, THIS TIME THE ELEVATOR IN AVON, SOUTH DAKOTA.

THE STATE’S PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION VOTED TO TAKE RECEIVERSHIP AFTER THE ELEVATOR DID NOT MEET THE REQUIREMENTS TO RENEW ITS GRAIN LICENSE AND THUS COULD NOT OBTAIN A FURTHER BOND. AT THE SAME TIME THE BANK CALLED IN THE AVON ELEVATOR’S NOTE. THE PUC ACTION SHOULD ALLOW FARMERS THAT SOLD GRAIN THERE TO GET PAID.

The dollar figures that we’ve seen show that there’s enough net worth there in order for that payment to be made, along with the bond proceeds that we will also be pursuing.

HE SAYS PAYMENTS STILL DEPEND ON THE VALUE OF THE ASSETS THAT ARE LIQUIDATED.

FROM CHINA DEMAND TO WEATHER, THERE ARE A LOT OF THINGS AFFECTING AGRICULTURE RIGHT NOW.

BUT NOTED AG ECONOMIST, DR. DAVID KOHL, SAYS PUTTING INFORMATION TO WORK ON YOUR OPERATION WILL BE THE KEY TO SUCCESS.

KOHL SPOKE RECENTLY AT BELL BANK’S ANNUAL AG CONFERENCE IN FARGO. HE SAYS THE COVID AID MONEY PUMPED INTO THE ECONOMY SHOULD KEEP IT PROPPED UP FOR A COUPLE MORE YEARS.

BUT HE CAUTIONS THE RALLY GROWERS ARE FINALLY ENJOYING IN MANY COMMODITIES COULD BE TEMPORARY.

CURRENT HIGH PRICES ARE DEPENDANT ON WHETHER THE DROUGHT CONTINUES IN THE U.S. BUT ALSO IN BRAZIL, EUROPE AND ELSEWHERE. AND HE SAYS TRADE WITH CHINA MAY NEVER FULLY RECOVER, SO U.S. PRODUCERS NEED TO THINK BEYOND CHINA.

Dr. David Kohl: THINK OF THE WHOLE ASIAN REGION, ALL THE WAY FROM JAPAN TO INDIA TO SOUTHEAST ASIA. YOU KNOW WHAT I TELL PRODUCERS? DON’T BET YOUR FARM ON TRADE WITH CHINA. THEY CAN GIVE IT AND THEY CAN TAKE IT AWAY.

KOHL’S BEST ADVICE IS TO MANAGE THE THINGS YOU CAN CONTROL, AND MANAGE AROUND THE THINGS YOU CAN’T.

UP NEXT ON AGWEEK TV, WE KICK OFF OUR ANNUAL CEREAL GRAINS TOUR WITH

A LOOK AT HOW THE REGION’S WHEAT IS FARING IN THE DROUGHT.

WE’RE KICKING OFF THE AGWEEK CEREAL CROPS TOUR WITH A STOP IN NORTHWEST MINNESOTA, WHERE WHEAT AND OTHER CEREAL CROPS ARE A WEEK OR TWO AHEAD OF SCHEDULE.

MIKKEL PATES TALKED TO A CROP CONSULTANT NEAR BORUP, WHERE FARMERS ARE ALREADY GETTING READY TO HARVEST.

GROWERS IN THIS PART OF NORTHWEST MINNESOTA STARTED SEEDING WHEAT EARLY THIS YEAR, IN LATE MARCH, AND WERE ABOUT HALF DONE BY THE FIRST WEEK IN APRIL BUT THEN PLANTING WAS INTERRUPTED BY SNOW, AND THEN IT STARTED TO GET DRY.

Josh Erbes: BETWEEN THE EARLY AND LATE PLANT DATE, WE’RE SEEING A PRETTY SIMILAR CROP BETWEEN THAT THAT WAS IN EVEN A MONTH EARLIER THAN THE STUFF THAT WAS SEEDED A MONTH LATER. YOU KNOW, IT KIND OF COMES DOWN TO MAYBE SOIL TYPES. YOU GET SOME OF THE LIGHTER SOILS THEY’RE REALLY SHOWING THE DROUGHT STRESS.

AS A CROP CONSULTANT FOR CENTROL AG CONSULTING, JOSH ERBES COVERS NORMAN COUNTY AND PARTS OF CLAY AND BECKER COUNTIES IN MINNESOTA. AVERAGE RAINFALL AROUND HERE SHOULD BE 16 INCHES, BUT SO FAR THE REGION HAS SEEN LESS THAN FIVE.

Josh Erbes: AT THIS POINT IN TIME I DON’T THINK ANY FARMER WOULD WISH AWAY RAIN.

ERBES THINKS THAT WHAT’S SAVING THEM IS SUBSOIL MOISTURE STILL IN THE GROUND FROM THE EXCESSIVELY WET FALL OF 2019. DESPITE LOW RAINFALL SO FAR, YIELDS HERE ARE LIKELY TO BE PRETTY CLOSE TO AVERAGE.

Josh Erbes: IN THIS AREA I WOULD STILL SAY 60 TO 70 BUSHEL IS A TYPICAL AVERAGE SPRING WHEAT YIELD, SO WE’RE GOING TO PROBABLY BE TEN BUSHEL OFF OF THAT THIS YEAR WOULD BE KIND OF OUR GUESS RIGHT NOW.

RIGHT NOW MANY FARMERS ARE APPLYING ROUNDUP AS A PRE-HARVEST AID. AND

THEY’RE ANXIOUS TO GET THE CRPO SAFELY OFF THE FIELD.

Josh Erbes: IT HASN’T BEEN MANY YEARS WE’VE BEEN ABLE TO TAKE MUCH WHEAT OFF IN JULY AND LIKE I SAY THE COMBINES SHOULD BE ROLLING HEAVY THE LAST FEW DAYS OF JULY AND THAT FIRST WEEK OF AUGUST, WHICH WILL PUT US A WEEK IF NOT TWO WEEKS AHEAD OF WHERE WE’VE BEEN THE LAST HANDFUL OF YEARS.

ON THE AGWEEK CEREAL CROPS TOUR, THIS IS MIKKEL PATES.

THE DISASTROUS SPRING WHEAT CROP IN SOUTH DAKOTA COMES AS NO SURPRISE AS CROP RATINGS HAVE BEEN DROPPING ALL SPRING.

THIS LAST WEEK USDA PEGGED ONLY 5-PERCENT OF THE STATE’S CROP IN GOOD CONDITION AND 70-PERCENT IN THE POOR TO VERY POOR CATEGORY. THESE ARE SOME OF THE WORST RATINGS IN RECENT HISTORY AND MAY TRANSLATE INTO STATE SPRING WHEAT PRODUCTION BEING CUT IN HALF.

Timing of planting, timing of fill, timing of the heat events certainly have all had a factor, but we’re going to see significant declines both in harvested acres and in yield.

HE SAYS A PERCENTAGE OF THE SPRING WHEAT WILL BE HARVESTED FOR HAY BUT SOME IS SO SHORT IT CAN’T BE CUT AND WILL BE ZEROED OUT FOR INSURANCE.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, BARLEY GROWERS GET A TASTE OF WHAT’S NEW AT ANHEUSER-BUSCH.

AND LATER, DROUGHT IS ADDING TO FARM STRESS THIS YEAR, WE’LL HAVE SOME ADVICE ON CARING FOR YOUR MENTAL HEALTH.

THE HOT DRY WEATHER PATTERN STILL PERSISTS IN THE REGION, HOW MUCH LONGER WILL IT LAST?

HERE’S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

LIKE MOST CROPS IN THE REGION, THE BARLEY CROP IS STRUGGLING IN THE DROUGHT.

BARLEY GROWERS GATHERED THIS WEEK AT THE AHEUSER-BUSCH MALTING PLANT IN MOORHEAD FOR THE ANNUAL “GROWER DAYS” TO LEARN ABOUT THE NEWEST VARIETAL DEVELOPMENTS. EMILY BEAL HAS MORE IN THIS WEEK’S AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Nikki Zahradka: NO BARLEY, NO BEER, RIGHT? SO WE ABSOLUTELY NEED THE BARLEY FARMERS.

OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS, ANHEUSER-BUSCH HAS BEEN SWITCHING ITS GROWERS FROM TRADITIONAL SIX ROW BARLEY TWO ROW. THE COMPANY’S MIDWEST REGIONAL AGRONOMY MANAGER SAYS THEY’RE ALSO DEVELOPING NEW VARIETIES OF BARLEY THAT CAN BETTER HANDLE STRESSORS IN THIS AREA, LIKE THIS YEAR’S DROUGHT.

Nikki Zahradka: WE’RE TRYING TO TEACH THESE GROWERS HOW TO GROW THESE NEW TWO ROWS IN THIS REGION, BETWEEN SEEDING RATES, DIFFERENT SEEDING RATES, DIFFERENT NITROGEN RATES AND DIFFERENT PLANT POPULATIONS.

Austin Case: SO OUR AGRONOMISTS HAVE BEEN OUT IN THE REGION

WORKING WITH THEIR GROWERS, TO TRY TO OPTIMALLY MANAGE WHAT THEY CAN THROUGH THIS DROUGHT.

AUSTIN CASE IS THE COMPANY’S NORTH AMERICAN BARLEY BREEDER. HE SAYS GROWERS ARE CONCERNED ABOUT QUALITY AND YIELD IN THE DROUGHT. BUT ANHEUSER-BUSCH IS TRYING TO MAKE THE BEST OF A BAD SITUATION. THEY’RE TESTING SEEING WHICH VARIETIES ADAPT BEST TO DRY CONDITIONS, WHICH CAN LEAVE BARLEY WITH LESS PLUMP KERNELS, LOWER TEST WEIGHTS AND HIGHER PROTEIN.

Austin Case: ON THE GENETIC SIDE WE’RE WORKING ON DROUGHT TOLERANCE, WE’RE WORKING ON DISEASE RESISTANCE, STABLE YIELDING VARIETIES, A LOT OF REALLY GOOD TECHNOLOGY BEING UTILIZED TO HELP BREED BETTER BARLEYS.

Emily Beal: WHILE THE DROUGHT MAY HAVE BEEN ON THEIR MINDS, MANY PRODUCERS WERE EXCITED TO GET TO TALK TO FELLOW GROWERS, WHILE ENJOYING AN ICE COLD BEER. WITH AGWEEK, I’M EMILY BEAL IN MOORHEAD MINNESOTA.

BARLEY THAT DOESN’T MAKE THE CUT FOR BEER CAN BE SOLD FOR FEED, WHICH IS GOING FOR A PRETTY GOOD PRICE THIS YEAR. YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

FARMING AND RANCHING ARE EXTREMELY STRESSFUL, BUT THIS YEAR’S WEATHER IS MAKING IT EVEN WORSE FOR MANY.

IN RURAL AREAS, THERE CAN BE A STIGMA ATTACHED TO SEEKING HELP FOR MENTAL HEALTH.

TELEMEDICINE HAS HELPED TO REACH PEOPLE IN RURAL AREAS, ESPECIALLY DURING THE PANDEMIC.

SHAUNA REITMEIER LEADS A MINNESOTA MENTAL HEALTH AGENCY. MUCH OF THEIR OUTREACH IS ONLINE OR BY PHONE, WITHOUT EVEN LEAVING THE TRACTOR. SHE SAYS THERE ARE MANY SIMPLE TECHNIQUES YOU CAN USE TO LOWER STRESS LEVELS.

Shauna Reitmeier: WE CAN’T CHANGE THE DROUGHT, WE CAN’T CHANGE THE MARKETS, BUT WHAT WE CAN DO FOR OURSELVES WILL HOPEFULLY BE ABLE TO HELP SOMEBODY REDUCE SOME OF THE STRESS, FEEL A LITTLE MORE CALM. AND HAVE A BETTER LIFE.

EXPERTS SAY YOUR HEALTH IS THE MOST IMPORTANT ASSET ON YOUR OPERATION, SO IT’S IMPORTANT TO TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF FIRST.

WE’RE FOLLOWING SOME FARMERS THROUGH THE GROWING SEASON, AND THIS WEEK WE’RE CHECKING IN ON THE SPIEKERMEIER FARM AT SHELDON, NORTH DAKOTA.

WE FOUND NATHAN PUTTING DOWN 28% NITROGEN ON SOME OF THE CORN HE GROWS WITH HIS FATHER DAN.

LIKE MOST GROWERS IN OUR REGION, NATHAN SAYS THEY NEED MORE PRECIPITATION.

Nathan Spiekermeier: THE CROPS ARE LOOKING PRETTY GOOD. WE DEFINITELY NEED A SHOT OF RAIN. THE HILLTOPS AND SIDEHILLS ARE DEFINITELY STARTING TO PINEAPPLE A LITTLE BIT ON THE CORN LEAVES AND STUFF LIKE THAT. BUT OVERALL I THINK IF WE KEEP ON GETTING SOME RAIN SPACED OUT HERE AND THERE WE’LL BE OK.

THE SPIEKERMEIERS MAKE SOIL HEALTH ONE OF THEIR TOP PRIORITIES, WITH PRACTICES LIKE STRIP TILLING AND PRECISION FERTILIZER PLACEMENT.

STILL AHEAD, AN ORGANIC BERRY FARM THRIVES, DESPITE THE DROUGHT.

A FORMER CORN AND SOYBEAN FARM IS NOW AN ORGANIC BERRY OPERATION THAT ATTRACTS PICKERS FROM AROUND SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA.

AS NOAH FISH REPORTS, THE LITTLE HILL BERRY FARM IS THRIVING DESPITE THE DROUGHT.

Aaron Wills: WE SPECIALIZE IN BERRIES. WE GROW ORGANIC BLUEBERRIES, STRAWBERRIES AND RASPBERRIES. OUR BIGGEST CROP IS BLUEBERRIES.

THIS IS THE EIGHTH YEAR OF YOU-PICK BERRIES AT THE LITTLE HILL BERRY FARM IN NORTHFIELD, MINNESOTA. OWNER AARON WILLS SAYS THE DROUGHT HAS BEEN HARD ON HIS CROP, ESPECIALLY THE STRAWBERRIES.

Aaron WIlls: BLUEBERRIES HAVE KIND OF DONE OK, BUT LIKE STRAWBERRIES IT WAS REALLY HARD ON, SO WE IRRIGATED PROBABLY MORE THAN WE EVER HAVE IN THE PAST.

WILLS SAYS BLUEBERRIES ARE THEIR MOST POPULAR, WITH ABOUT 10,000 POUNDS PICKED EACH SUMMER. HE SAYS LAST SUMMER’S COVID CLOSURES GAVE HIS BUSINESS A BOOST, AND NOW THEY SEE BETWEEN TWO HUNDRED AND FOUR HUNDRED PICKERS EACH WEEKEND.

Aaron WIlls: I MEAN WE MET A LOT OF NEW CUSTOMERS LAST YEAR I THINK BECAUSE PEOPLE COULDN’T TRAVEL, AND A LOT OF OTHER THINGS THEY COULDN’T DO. AND SO NOW THEY’VE STARTED TO COME BACK, YOU KNOW, HOPEFULLY YEAR AFTER YEAR, SO THIS YEAR’S BEEN REALLY GOOD.

LITTLE HILL HAS ABOUT TWELVE TO FIFTEEN EMPLOYEES DURING THE BERRY SEASON, INCLUDING FABIA DENNISON. SHE LOVES BEING OUTSIDE, AND HELPING THE CUSTOMERS.

Fabia Dennison: WE HAVE A FARMERS MARKET ON SATURDAYS TOO, THAT WE BRING LOCAL BAKERY AND VEGETABLES AND THAT GIVES AN OPPORTUNITY FOR PEOPLE IN TOWN TO GET OTHER STUFF TOO.

IN NORTHFIELD, MINNESOTA, THIS IS NOAH FISH FOR AGWEEK.

THE FARM IS OPEN THROUGH SEPTEMBER.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK’S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, AND FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *